Adopt a Retriever (Labrador) Rescue Dog | Rosie | Dogs Trust (2024)

Adopt a Retriever (Labrador) Rescue Dog | Rosie | Dogs Trust (1)

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RESERVED

I'm looking for my forever home. Could you be my perfect match?

Breed

Retriever (Labrador)

Reference ID

1266351

Age

5 - 7 years

Sex

Female

Size

Large

Medical care

I need ongoing medical care

Apply to adopt a dog like Rosie

HELP ME FIND A HOME

Are you right for Rosie?

Rosie is a sweet, timid 6 year-old labrador looking for an adult-only home. She is nervous around new people, sudden movements and loud noises, so her ideal home would be quiet with minimal visitors and away from busy roads. Rosie is curious and takes her time sniffing and investigating new places and people. She does come around to people quickly, but on her own terms. Playing with the other dogs in her group is her favourite pasttime and she would thrive in a home with another, confident, calm dog or dogs. She gets quite excited with the idea of going out on walks and is currently working on being more confident with both handling and going in the car. She is housetrained. Rosie will not be able to be left alone. Because of this, she needs a patient, understanding owner who will give Rosie all the time she needs before starting to build up alone very gradually.

Is Rosie right for you?

Rosie enjoys her food, perhaps a little too much! She adores her soft toys and tennis balls and likes to carry them around with her. She will happily play by herself with her soft toys before going off for a quiet nap. When she spots her favourite people, Rosie will show her happy, goofy side and enjoy a little fuss. Once she has built a bond with you, Rosie loves snuggling up beside you. Please be aware that Rosie is on ongoing medication which the team will discuss with her adopters in more detail during the reservation process. Rosie would make an adorable companion and would love a forever home where she can just potter around. If you are ready to adopt and support a girl like Rosie, please apply on our website.

Adopt a Retriever (Labrador) Rescue Dog | Rosie | Dogs Trust (2)

Everything you need to know about Labradors

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How our rehoming process works

Thanks for your interest in Rosie. To apply to adopt a dog like Rosie, these are your next steps.

1

Create an account and fill out our application form

In our form you can tell us all about your home, your lifestyle and the kind of dogs you’re interested in. You won’t be applying for a specific dog, but you can add favourites to give us an idea of the dogs you like. We’ll use this information to find a great match for …

In our form you can tell us all about your home, your lifestyle and the kind of dogs you’re interested in. You won’t be applying for a specific dog, but you can add favourites to give us an idea of the dogs you like. We’ll use this information to find a great match for you.

Apply Now

2

Choose a rehoming centre

We’ll also ask you to select a rehoming centre. The team at this centre will look after your application and assess you against all suitable dogs in their care. This doesn’t have to be your nearest centre, but you will need to travel there within a few days once we’ve found …

We’ll also ask you to select a rehoming centre. The team at this centre will look after your application and assess you against all suitable dogs in their care. This doesn’t have to be your nearest centre, but you will need to travel there within a few days once we’ve found you a match.

3

We’ll contact you within seven days

We’ll be in touch by phone or email within seven days of receiving your application to have a chat about your dog search. Then we'll start looking for a great match for you.

We will make two attempts to contact you. If after the second attempt we don’t hear back from …

We’ll be in touch by phone or email within seven days of receiving your application to have a chat about your dog search. Then we'll start looking for a great match for you.

We will make two attempts to contact you. If after the second attempt we don’t hear back from you, we will close your application for now and invite you to reapply again when you’re ready.

4

We’ll keep your application open for three months and keep looking for a match

You won't need to do anything else or apply again for three months. We’ll keep reviewing your application against all the dogs at your chosen centre. Not all available dogs are featured on our website; dogs of all shapes and sizes regularly come into our care, and your …

You won't need to do anything else or apply again for three months. We’ll keep reviewing your application against all the dogs at your chosen centre. Not all available dogs are featured on our website; dogs of all shapes and sizes regularly come into our care, and your application will be considered for any dogs that match your requirements. We’ll contact you as soon as we find a good match.

If for some reason we don’t find the right dog in that time, you can reapply, and we’ll keep looking.

5

When we find a match, we’ll invite you to meet them

If we’ve found a dog who seems right for you, we’ll invite you to come and meet them at the rehoming centre.

Some of the dogs in our care will need to meet potential owners several times to get to know one another. This lets us see you’re compatible and gives …

If we’ve found a dog who seems right for you, we’ll invite you to come and meet them at the rehoming centre.

Some of the dogs in our care will need to meet potential owners several times to get to know one another. This lets us see you’re compatible and gives you the chance to build a bond before making a commitment to give them a new home. By taking some time at the beginning to make sure everyone’s comfortable, an adoption is more likely to be successful.

We may also arrange a home visit with you, to see how your house will be set up and check that the garden (if you have one) is secure. This may not be necessary, though, especially if you’ve adopted from us before. Where you already have dogs, we may accept a reference from your vet as an alternative.

6

If we haven’t found the right match, we’ll continue the search together

If we haven’t found the right dog for you within three months, we’ll let you know your application is closed. We’ll invite you to apply again so we have up-to-date information about you, and we’ll keep looking.

If we haven’t found the right dog for you within three months, we’ll let you know your application is closed. We’ll invite you to apply again so we have up-to-date information about you, and we’ll keep looking.

7

We’ll support you to embark on a new life with your dog

When we’ve matched you with a dog, we’ll help you welcome them to your home. After adoption we’ll keep in touch to see how you and the dog are doing. If you need any advice or support, we’re just a phone call away.

With our nationwide Dog School, free behaviour …

When we’ve matched you with a dog, we’ll help you welcome them to your home. After adoption we’ll keep in touch to see how you and the dog are doing. If you need any advice or support, we’re just a phone call away.

With our nationwide Dog School, free behaviour support, our Canine Care Card and more, we’re here to support you and your dog for as long as you need us.

How we help

Contact Details

Location

Dogs Trust Salisbury (Wiltshire)
45 Amesbury Road
Newton Tony
Wiltshire
SP4 0HW

Google Maps

Opening times

We’re open for general browsing on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 12–4pm. Wednesday and Friday mornings are by pre-arranged appointment only.

Contact

0303 003 0000

info@dogstrust.org.uk

More useful information

Discover more about this dogs needs and how you might be able to support them should your rehoming application be successful.

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FAQs

Why are there so many Labrador Retrievers in shelters? ›

According to the AKC, Labrador Retrievers are the #1 reproduced dog in the US; thus, they are the most prevalent breed mix in shelters. The #1 reason that Labs are in shelters is LACK OF OWNER COMMITMENT.

Why did Labrador Retrievers almost go extinct? ›

Long before these lovable creatures became America's favorite dogs, their breed went close to extinction in the late 1800s. Heavy taxation on dog ownership in Newfoundland, where they originated from, caused them to go extinct in Canada but the breed managed to survive in England.

Do Labrador Retrievers calm down? ›

Labs don't start “settling” down until sometime between two and four years of age. A few labradors are quiet and sedate from early puppyhood onward, and a few others are bouncing puppymaniacs until well into old age, but by and large, you can expect to see mental maturation happening between two and four years of age.

What is the best age to adopt a lab puppy? ›

between 7 1/2 and 12 weeks, but 8 - 9 weeks is the ideal. Anything before 7 1/2 weeks is too young (even a few days here can make a difference) as the pup needs to learn from the dam and siblings about canine body language and bite inhibition.

What is the number one cause of death for Labrador Retrievers? ›

Labradors are generally healthy dogs that live 10-12 years on average. However, they do have some health issues that can cause them to die at a younger age. The main causes of death in Labradors are cancer, heatstroke, epilepsy, heart disease and bloat (gastric torsion).

What breed of dog is most surrendered? ›

Staffordshire Terriers (Pit bulls) are the most often adopted shelter dog simply because they are the most surrendered and the most found as a stray by Animal Control Officers.

What two breeds make a Labrador Retriever? ›

The Labrador breed dates back to at least the 1830s, when St. John's water dogs bred by European settlers in Newfoundland were first introduced to Britain from ships trading between Canada and Poole in Dorset. These were then bred with British hunting dogs to create what became known as the Labrador Retriever.

Why are Labrador Retrievers so special? ›

They are intelligent and fairly easy to train, partly from their desire to work with people. They are easy keepers and can become overweight if they are not exercised and food portions adjusted as needed. Labs are excellent family dogs because they do want to be with people and many do not do well as kennel dogs.

How can you tell if a Labrador is good quality? ›

Things You Should Know
  1. Check if the puppy has a short, dense coat that's solid black, yellow, or brown. ...
  2. Test the puppy's DNA by swabbing their cheek with a DNA test kit. ...
  3. Ask the puppy's breeder for the pup's pedigree papers, which list their ancestor's background and can verify their purebred status.

Which color lab is the calmest? ›

A lab's temperament has nothing to do with their color. Labradors, regardless of what color coat they have, are known to be sweet-natured and very calm. But if a lab acts up, this can be the result of being under-exercised or they have been incorrectly trained.

What are the disadvantages of Labrador retriever? ›

However, Labradors also have a tendency to forget their size and can be overly excitable when playing meaning they are often better suited to families with slightly older children. As with any breed, Labradors should always be supervised when around children to make sure everyone stays safe and happy.

Do Labrador Retrievers have a favorite person? ›

Yes, dogs can have a favorite person, and it may or may not be you. It could be your spouse, one of your children, your mom when she visits, or the girl who walks your dog while you're at work.

Should I get a girl or boy Lab puppy? ›

Male labrador retrievers have been known for being more attached and enjoy being with their owners. This is not to say that female labradors are aloof towards their owners, but males tend to display more affection. Male lab retrievers are the ideal dog breed if you're looking for a loyal furry friend.

How do I choose a Lab puppy from a litter? ›

In order to select a healthy puppy, it is important to do your research:
  1. Talk to the owner. Ask about appetite and eliminations. ...
  2. Observe the litter mates in action. Do they all play together or is there a quiet one that retreats to a corner? ...
  3. Survey their overall appearance. Do the puppies' coats shine? ...
  4. Watch them move.

Is raising a Lab puppy hard? ›

The Labrador is known for their trainability, they are a very active breed and are highly motivated, making them extremely easy to train. They are willing to please and are quick to pick up house training. Due to their high activity level, if not given enough stimulation, can become destructive.

Are Labrador Retrievers no longer the most popular breed? ›

Around 108,000 French Bulldogs were recorded in the U.S. in 2022, surpassing Labrador Retrievers by over 21,000. The French Bulldog's popularity has grown exponentially over the past decade.

Why are most service dogs Labradors? ›

While sociable, Labs are also devoted and eager to please. This, coupled with high levels of intelligence, makes them both easy to train and attentive to their owner's needs. Physically, Labs are hardy and athletic, enabling them to keep up with their handlers as they go about their day.

Why are Labradors so common? ›

Loyal and Bonded

While some may have a stronger bond with some family members, they are very accepting of everyone in the home. This is different than some breeds that have a tendency to bond very strongly with one person, which makes the Lab a dog that is happy to spend time with everyone in the family.

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